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How can I uninstall / remove EAC from my computer?

Uninstalling EAC is quite forward: Usually EAC lists itself under Start, All Programs in a folder called Exact Audio Copy. In that folder there is an entry called Uninstall. Click on this entry and follow the dialogs that are shown on the screen, confirm that you really want to uninstall EAC from your computer.
If you don’t have any start menu entry for EAC (or can’t find it), for Windows XP go to Start, Control Panel and then double click Add or Remove Programs. For Windows Vista go to Start, Control Panel and then click Programs and Features. In the Currently installed programs box, choose “Exact Audio Copy” and press the Change or Change/Remove button. Follow the dialogs that are shown on the screen, confirm that you really want to uninstall EAC from your computer.

I use Windows NT/2000, but EAC seems to have problems to store the options or get any SCSI response.

Make sure you start EAC from an admin account, as some functions need a to access low level system routines, which are not accessable from user accounts. If you use the “Native SCSI Interface”, try the “ASPI Interface” instead, perhaps it will already help.
A user send this suggestion, feel free to try it out :
In administrator mode, Start, Run, MMC
Console Menu, Add/Remove Snap-in
Add.
Group Policy
(Group Policy will be shown as “Local Computer Policy”. Actually, if your computer receives its policies from a network server, it won’t show and you’ll have to set it directly on the server, ask your admin then. )
Ok
On the tree, Console Root, Local Computer Policy, Computer Configuration, Windows Settings, Security Settings, Local Policies, Security Options
Find “Restrict CD-ROM access to locally logged-on user only”. It should be disabled by default. Enable it.
No need to reboot, when quitting MMC, no need to save.
What this does is allow any local software to lock the drive for exclusive use. What this removes is the ability to use the CD-Rom as a Terminal Services client. With this, EAC works seamlessly. It also makes it possible to use a CD-Writer as restricted user with whatever software you choose.

When trying to install EAC in Windows NT or Windows 2000, I get the following error message: “The DLL WNASPI32.DLL could not be found in the specified path” then a list of paths. I searched my hard drives and the named DLL does not exist on my machine. I found the DLL on the web and installed it into windows\system32\. Then I tried to re-install EAC and got the following error message: “The ASPI interface could not be initialized correctly! (Error E4h) (ASPI for Windows failed init)”. What now?

EAC needs a driver called “ASPI”, it is an SCSI driver, but works also with IDE CD-ROM drives (not a single file, but a complete package, so installing just the DLL won’t help). It is included in Win95/98, but not in Windows NT/2000. The newer versions of EAC should not absolute need ASPI anymore, but ASPI would be nevertheless the most stable. ASPI is available from different manufacturers (of SCSI interface cards), but it seems that the only working one with EAC is coming from Adaptec.
First of all you should upgrade to a newer version of EAC, as ASPI is not absolutely necessary any more.

In the column “Copy Protection” is always “Yes” denoted. What does it mean, will it not be possible to extract the tracks?

It is possible also to extract copy protected tracks, as the copy protection is only a flag on the CD, and all CD-ROM drives will ignore it on reading. Some month ago there are now also real copy protections for audio CDs, but this information is not given in the table. If there is such a CD, it will show garbage, not extract tracks or probably insert errors in the extraction.

I extracted all tracks of an audio CD and tried to write them back to CD, but the writing application tells me that the CD is not big enough, even when using 700 MB CD-Rs. When I look on the harddisk I see that the files are more than 800 MB in size. Why?

700 MB is the storage space for data CDs. Data has a third layer of error correction which need more storage space. So sector size is 2048 bytes for data and 2352 bytes for audio. There are around 360000 sectors on a 700 MB CD-R, that is 737280000 bytes = 703 MB for data sectors. On audio CDs this is 846720000 bytes = 807 MB. This is why the files are too big to write them as data files, but it should be possible to write them as audio CD instead.

When I extract, the extraction proceed very fast, but when I listen to the resulting files, they are all silent. What did I do wrong?

Sometimes EAC will autodetect a wrong read command. In this case it is possible that only silence is returned. Try to manually select a read command. In the Drive Options, go to Read Commands page and select the Read Command MMC1 manually (or any other that works). Test it with burst mode. If you tested all of them, but none of them worked, try to extract with another program like WinDAC or CDEx. If both also fails, make sure that your drive is capable of extracting digital audio at all.

I had ripped other records, they extracted fine. But there was one CD, where the ripping was desperately slow and the peak level of what I got was always 0%. Sometimes I got “Sync Errors”. I tried several times without success. What can I do then?

Have a look on the CD if it is dirty. Try to clean it (from the inner ring to the outer bound), perhaps it works better then. If not, try to lower speed or even to extract in burst mode, sometimes this will give better results (but no error reporting though).

When doing my very first CD rip, I got quite different size files. EAC produced a 867 KB Wav file, while Cdex produced a 21,806 KB Wav file on my hard drive. These two Wav files both played back fine using Winamp. So I have no idea as to why the two file sizes are so different?

If both files played the complete track, it looks like you produced a compressed WAV with EAC. In EAC, enter F11 and make sure the Waveform tab shows “Internal WAV routines” for Wave format. This will produce a WAV file that is about 176kB for every second of music.

When I extract tracks with EAC and write them to a CD-R with a burn program, I get 2 second gaps between each track. Why does EAC insert them?

EAC does not insert the gaps. These gaps are inserted by the writing program. There are two possibilities how these gaps could occur. Once if you write in TAO (Track At Once), there have to be a gap between tracks, so use DAO (Disc At Once) instead. Second, if you already use DAO, you should examine that program options, somewhere will be a flag where the standard 2 second gap could be deactivated.

If EAC encounters problems with an extraction, it slows down, which is fine. The problem is, it continues to read slowly on subsequent tracks, even if those tracks would not otherwise cause problems. I have verified this by stopping the process and restarting on another track that was extracting slowly; after restarting, it extracts full speed with no problems. What can I do?

If you have selected “Allow Speed Reduction” and the speed box also shows different possible speeds, then the problem lies within the reader. It could help to use the cool down feature (let it cool down every 15-30 min for several minutes, perhaps this already solves it). Otherwise don’t use the flag “Allow Speed Reduction”, but of course then it won’t read anymore that accurate on bad sectors.

I have clicked on the “Possible Errors” after extraction, and then I have to “Select A Track”. I do that and then I have 2 choices: Glitch Removal and Play. If I do any of these both, the whole track will be processed, I’m not sure where to find the position of the flaws.

When finished extracting, EAC will tell you if there were errors in the extraction. If there were, when you click the “Possible Errors” button, it will give you a time range that the error occured in. If it doesn’t report errors, it will not have a range, you will be able only to choose the whole track and not the specific positions (as there are none).

When using “Copy Image And Create CUE sheet” (or just creating a CUE sheet), EAC says it is getting pre-gap info on Track 1, the CD is spinning furiously, but nothing is getting written to the HD. I’ve left it as long as 2 hours, nothing changes in the GUI, no progress bar, no file gets created, nothing. (But I can cancel the operation.) What’s up?

Try to select another “Gap Detection Mode” in the drive options. If the selected mode does not work like that one, one of the other two should work at least.

The last few audio CD’s I’ve copied using EAC all have the track position wrong by about 1 second. If I go to a particular track with my CD player, it will start the track about 1 second INTO the audio track. I have been using the “Copy Image And Create CUE Sheet” option for copying the CD’s. How can I avoid this problem in the future?

One of the biggest mistakes that could be made in 0.85beta (from 0.9beta3 on I prevented it automatically) is to have selected “Remove Leading And Trailing Silence”. If the image file contains silence at the beginning (e.g. 1 second) it will be removed and everything get moved by one second. So you should deactivate this option for 0.85b4. If this is not the problem, try a different gap detection mode and compare the generated CUE sheets manually.

What is a compressed Wav file and how does it differ in quality from a regular wav file or from a MP3 file?

There are two groups of audio data, compressed and uncompressed data. The compressed group could also be splitted to lossless and lossy compression. Lossless compression is like having uncompressed data, only that the file is only around 70% of the uncompressed size (Comparable to compression with WinZIP). To the group of lossy compression also belongs MP3, it is not possible to recreate the original audio file 100%, there are frequencies missing, etc. Now, MP3 is ONE lossy compression format, there are others like AAC, MP2, TAC, etc. The nice side on WAVs is that it could be wrapped on any compression for which an audio codec exists in Windows. So if you own the Fraunhofer Codec (or the LAME/Blade/Gogo DLL) you could produce MP3-WAVs. These are standard MP3 files, but having a small header preceeding the actual data telling the player what codec to use for playing/decompression. So these files could be played with any media player or any other sound tool. As the header does not matter on MP3 compression, you could even rename the MP3-WAVs from .wav to .mp3 without loosing playability by a MP3 player.

How do I determine the combined read/write offset?

The combined read/write offset is only valid for the special combination of exactly one reading drive and exactly one writing drive. If you use another reading, you would most probably need a different combined offset. To determine this offset, you would need to write a CD-R/CD-RW. At first prepare WAV files you want to write to the CD. Then write it to a CD (either with any burning program, or with EAC using write offset 0). Do not delete the written WAV files. Afterwards you have to extract one or more tracks from the freshly burned CD, using the specific reader and using read offset 0. Of course you should not overwrite the original WAV files. Now you have to use the WAV Compare feature in EAC to compare the first WAV (original) with the second (reextracted one). Usually EAC will report either missing samples or extreneous samples. The number that is reported by that will be your combined offset, only be changed to positive or negative. If your original file has extreneous (repeated) samples or the copied file has missing samples the offset should be positive, otherwise it should be negative. (I hope this is correct) To double check the found offset, use that offset as sample offset for reading. Now The reextracted file and the original should be the same without missing or extreneous samples.

I have experienced the following problem after making some audio-cd copies : several tracks on the disk cannot be accessed directly on my audio cd-player although when the cd is played continuously it works fine. If I am using for playing the cd my cd-rom or my writer everything is OK and I can directly access all the tracks.

This happen sometimes, when the writer starts loosing the ability to find the correct positions for writing and the actual gaps are not 100% on the correct positions. Usually this happens to Yamaha writers sooner or later. So try to lower the writing speed and try different CD-R media. But it is also possible that a writer is not able to write very short gaps, so make sure that in the CUE sheet each gap is bigger than at least 100 sectors (1 1/3 second).

I have an audio CD which includes a CD-Extra segment. There are 11 audio tracks, the extra track 12 is indicated in EAC by a “file icon” instead of “music icon”. I can’t seem to determine how to produce a cue sheet which will allow the CD-Extra to be written via CDRWin. What is the recommended procedure for extracting the cue sheet from an audio CD which includes a CD-Extra segment?

As the data track has to be written in a second session(!) it is not possible to reproduce the complete CD with ONE cuesheet. Therefore you should burn at first the audio tracks, close the session (and leave the disk open). Then you could write the data track. I suggest writing the data files individually instead of writing an data image.

When I begin writing, EAC stops suddenly with an error, sometimes with no additional informations, what can I do?

EAC does not support all writers yet, so it is possible that EAC just do not work correctly with that drive. Further it would be possible that something in your system will break the stream to the writer, resulting in a buffer underrun. Make sure that there are no other applications are running while writing.
If could try to switch the sync data transfer on for the writer, you could find that option in the Windows Device Manager (System Properties), there select the writer and show up and edit the properties of that drive.

I have recorded and saved a noise wav (named nrp). I appear able to open it but am unable to subtract the noise profile from my subject wav (the “Reduce Noise” option is inoperable.) Any ideas om what I am doing wrong?

After created the noise profile (selecting a range, create noise profile, save noise profile) you are able to load the wav to denoise (or keep the actual one). There you have to load a noise profile first (noise profile/load), or keep the noise profile you created from that audio file, then you are able to remove the noise of it. You have to select first a range of the audio data that should be denoised before the menu option will be activated.



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